App Promotion Summit Berlin Wrap Up

By Thomas Sommer | November 29th, 2013

On Thursday we attended the Berlin edition of the App Promotion Summit, organized jointly by mobyaffiliates and all amber. This event took place roughly 5 months after the inaugural edition in London and aimed to address, discuss and provide insights on the main current challenges of the mobile marketing industry in the fields of discovery and distribution.

On Thursday we attended the Berlin edition of the App Promotion Summit, organized jointly by mobyaffiliates and all amber. This event took place roughly 5 months after the inaugural edition in London and aimed to address, discuss and provide insights on the main current challenges of the mobile marketing industry in the fields of discovery and distribution.

On Thursday we attended the Berlin edition of the App Promotion Summit, organized jointly by mobyaffiliates and all amber. This event took place roughly 5 months after the inaugural edition in London and aimed to address, discuss and provide insights on the main current challenges of the mobile marketing industry in the fields of discovery and distribution.

On Thursday we attended the Berlin edition of the App Promotion Summit, organized jointly by mobyaffiliates and all amber. This event took place roughly 5 months after the inaugural edition in London and aimed to address, discuss and provide insights on the main current challenges of the mobile marketing industry in the fields of discovery and distribution.

Wrapping up a day of individual speeches and panel discussions, the main takeaway from the event is probably the fact that the mobile market is no longer a landgrab. Away from the early days of intransparency and lack of education, the industry is getting more educated and structured as most of the players have now positioned themselves along the mobile value chain.

The second element to take out is the growing focus on the user lifecycle, as promotion needs to go beyond user acquisition and the launch of the app; listening to your users, building a community, tracking post-install events and optimizing acquisition budgets to maximize the users’ lifetime value (LTV) are now standard requirements for app publishers and marketers.

Getting into a bit more of detail, the event was structured in four parts:

  • App Stores - maximizing visibility (App Store Optimization)

  • User Acquisition- being specific, paid user acquisition

  • Lessons learned by successful app publishers

  • The next wave: what lies ahead in the field of mobile marketing

aps

Here’s a non-comprehensive selection of the topics covered (the whole program can be found here):

Games are still king

Games are still extremely well represented in overall app store downloads and revenues: on iPhone, between August 2012 and 2013, 33% of all downloads came from games. On iPad, this figures amounts to 50%. On Google Play, games make up 37% of downloads and on Amazon, 67%!

In terms of revenue, games represent 84% of all apps on iPhone, 73% on iPad on 84% on Google Play. In South Korea’ Play Store (the dominant platform), games generated as high as 94% of all store revenues.

App distribution: look to alternative solutions

In terms of app store marketing, a lesser known topic was covered by Stefan Bielau: alternative Android app stores, beyond Google Play.

In this regard, Apple App Store and the Google Play Store are very similar to the Panama Canal; they are bottlenecks: competitive, difficult and expensive to get through.

In this context, app marketers need alternative routes and thereby alternative app stores have some nice pros:

  • Extra distribution outlets, additional reach and much less competition. In China for instance, Tencent App Gem has as many downloads per app and per month as Google Play overall ($3,000). On a side note, in China 72.6% of Android apps are distributed through alternative app stores.

  • Paid promotion services (such as on Amazon Apps and AndroidPIT), which are so far non existent on the Apple AppStore and Google Play

  • Access to new markets; Google Play is only available in 134 countries (vs. 196 countries worldwide according to the UN) and not in China

  • Additional branding presence

  • TinyCo revealed that their ARPU is higher on the Amazon Store than on the Apple App Store or the Play Store.

On the other hand, the cons are:

  • The app store marketing assets (meta data such as file formats, number of characters in the title etc.) are different on each store.

  • You need to carefully plan the time to market, as you cannot realistically launch in more than 3 app stores simultaneously.

  • You need to handle reporting for each of them (luckily there are aggregator tools out there to help you out)

Optimization is no option

On the topic of advertised promotions, the audience was reminded that the creative is often the very first contact of the users with the app. In this sense, creatives are part of the product, and they systematically need to be optimized. It has been proven that A/B testing more than 10 variations of the same creative increased back to back conversions by 25%...

We ourselves at AppLift presented the three waves of paid user acquisition:

The industry is currently in the last stage, where the focus is primarily put on tracking post-install events in regards to engagement, virality and monetization metrics. In turn, this enables advertisers to allocate their UA budgets to the best-performing traffic sources and thereby optimize the lifetime value of the users acquired. A complete wrap up of the presentation is available on pocketgamer.biz.

The Social Network

Facebook as a tool for app promotion (newsfeed ads) was also big on the agenda. An interesting psychological study states that checking your newsfeed apps to see how many people liked that holiday sunset picture triggers an addictive dopamine rush, which in turn produces a feeling of excitement and gets you hooked to the app!

A few other interesting Facebook figures:

  • Facebook produces 180 billion daily newsfeed impressions

  • In 2013, Facebook was the second mobile advertising company in the word after Google with 15% market share, up from 5% in 2012. In 2011, Facebook was not yet making any revenue on mobile.

  • 7 out of 10 people check Facebook before going to sleep.

  • In Germany, 76% of Facebook’s Monthly Active Users come back to the app daily.

Finally, some interesting data points were shown on the best days of the week to promote your app on Facebook, optimizing two variables: average conversion rate (CVR) and CPI. It turns out the best 2 days to advertise are Thursday (average CVR but low CPI) and Sunday (average CPI and high CVR).

Rekindling the spark

Retargeting and remarketing is also due to become a more important topic for app marketers, as studies show that 25% of users open an app only once, while 69% of users open an app less than 10 times. Publishers thereby need to think about the whole lifecycle of the app and their users, not just the launch period. In 2014, we should hear a lot more about retargeting.

“Users age like fine wine”

The audience was also advised that, when setting up in-app analytics tracking, app publishers should be careful not to compare apples to oranges: use cohort analytics to erase all interference and track KPIs which are comparable as well as mirror what you actually want your users to do.

iOS publishers, brace yourselves: video is coming.

Last week, the unexpected presence of a video on the Apple feature page for NaturalMotion’s game Clumsy Ninja is likely to forebode the more general introduction of videos on the iOS AppStore, which will create a great opportunity for publishers. Get ready! Regarding Google Play, where video has already been part of the app store assets for some time, developers should integrate the Google Analytics SDK in order to track the Google Play funnel and conduct A/B testing on the app store creatives.

apssmall

That's it!What’s your take on the latest developments in app promotion and marketing? We’re keen on hearing your thoughts! If you need additional insights, or would like to contribute your own to the blog with a guest post, don’t hesitate to drop us a line at blog@www.applift.com.[yks-mailchimp-list id="b97ff5c6cc"]

Wrapping up a day of individual speeches and panel discussions, the main takeaway from the event is probably the fact that the mobile market is no longer a landgrab. Away from the early days of intransparency and lack of education, the industry is getting more educated and structured as most of the players have now positioned themselves along the mobile value chain.

The second element to take out is the growing focus on the user lifecycle, as promotion needs to go beyond user acquisition and the launch of the app; listening to your users, building a community, tracking post-install events and optimizing acquisition budgets to maximize the users’ lifetime value (LTV) are now standard requirements for app publishers and marketers.

Getting into a bit more of detail, the event was structured in four parts:

  • App Stores - maximizing visibility (App Store Optimization)

  • User Acquisition- being specific, paid user acquisition

  • Lessons learned by successful app publishers

  • The next wave: what lies ahead in the field of mobile marketing

aps

Here’s a non-comprehensive selection of the topics covered (highlights):

Games are still king

Games are still extremely well represented in overall app store downloads and revenues: on iPhone, between August 2012 and 2013, 33% of all downloads came from games. On iPad, this figures amounts to 50%. On Google Play, games make up 37% of downloads and on Amazon, 67%!

In terms of revenue, games represent 84% of all apps on iPhone, 73% on iPad on 84% on Google Play. In South Korea’ Play Store (the dominant platform), games generated as high as 94% of all store revenues.

App distribution: look to alternative solutions

In terms of app store marketing, a lesser known topic was covered: alternative Android app stores, beyond Google Play.

In this regard, Apple App Store and the Google Play Store are very similar to the Panama Canal; they are bottlenecks: competitive, difficult and expensive to get through.

In this context, app marketers need alternative routes and thereby alternative app stores have some nice pros:

  • Extra distribution outlets, additional reach and much less competition. In China for instance, Tencent App Gem has as many downloads per app and per month as Google Play overall ($3,000). On a side note, in China 72.6% of Android apps are distributed through alternative app stores.

  • Paid promotion services (such as on Amazon Apps and AndroidPIT), which are so far non existent on the Apple AppStore and Google Play

  • Access to new markets; Google Play is only available in 134 countries (vs. 196 countries worldwide according to the UN) and not in China

  • Additional branding presence

  • TinyCo revealed that their ARPU is higher on the Amazon Store than on the Apple App Store or the Play Store.

On the other hand, the cons are:

  • The app store marketing assets (meta data such as file formats, number of characters in the title etc.) are different on each store.

  • You need to carefully plan the time to market, as you cannot realistically launch in more than 3 app stores simultaneously.

  • You need to handle reporting for each of them (luckily there are aggregator tools out there to help you out)

Optimization is no option

On the topic of advertised promotions, the audience was reminded that the creative is often the very first contact of the users with the app. In this sense, creatives are part of the product, and they systematically need to be optimized. It has been proven that A/B testing more than 10 variations of the same creative increased back to back conversions by 25%...

We ourselves at AppLift presented the three waves of paid user acquisition:

The industry is currently in the last stage, where the focus is primarily put on tracking post-install events in regards to engagement, virality and monetization metrics. In turn, this enables advertisers to allocate their UA budgets to the best-performing traffic sources and thereby optimize the lifetime value of the users acquired. A complete wrap up of the presentation is available on pocketgamer.biz.

The Social Network

Facebook as a tool for app promotion (newsfeed ads) was also big on the agenda. An interesting psychological study states that checking your newsfeed apps to see how many people liked that holiday sunset picture triggers an addictive dopamine rush, which in turn produces a feeling of excitement and gets you hooked to the app!

A few other interesting Facebook figures:

  • Facebook produces 180 billion daily newsfeed impressions

  • In 2013, Facebook was the second mobile advertising company in the word after Google with 15% market share, up from 5% in 2012. In 2011, Facebook was not yet making any revenue on mobile.

  • 7 out of 10 people check Facebook before going to sleep.

  • In Germany, 76% of Facebook’s Monthly Active Users come back to the app daily.

Finally, some interesting data points were shown on the best days of the week to promote your app on Facebook, optimizing two variables: average conversion rate (CVR) and CPI. It turns out the best 2 days to advertise are Thursday (average CVR but low CPI) and Sunday (average CPI and high CVR).

Rekindling the spark

Retargeting and remarketing is also due to become a more important topic for app marketers, as studies show that 25% of users open an app only once, while 69% of users open an app less than 10 times. Publishers thereby need to think about the whole lifecycle of the app and their users, not just the launch period. In 2014, we should hear a lot more about retargeting.

“Users age like fine wine”

The audience was also advised that, when setting up in-app analytics tracking, app publishers should be careful not to compare apples to oranges: use cohort analytics to erase all interference and track KPIs which are comparable as well as mirror what you actually want your users to do.

iOS publishers, brace yourselves: video is coming.

Last week, the unexpected presence of a video on the Apple feature page for NaturalMotion’s game Clumsy Ninja is likely to forebode the more general introduction of videos on the iOS AppStore, which will create a great opportunity for publishers. Get ready! Regarding Google Play, where video has already been part of the app store assets for some time, developers should integrate the Google Analytics SDK in order to track the Google Play funnel and conduct A/B testing on the app store creatives.

apssmall

That's it!What’s your take on the latest developments in app promotion and marketing? We’re keen on hearing your thoughts! If you need additional insights, or would like to contribute your own to the blog with a guest post, don’t hesitate to drop us a line at blog@www.applift.com.

[yks-mailchimp-list id="b97ff5c6cc"]

Wrapping up a day of individual speeches and panel discussions, the main takeaway from the event is probably the fact that the mobile market is no longer a landgrab. Away from the early days of intransparency and lack of education, the industry is getting more educated and structured as most of the players have now positioned themselves along the mobile value chain.

The second element to take out is the growing focus on the user lifecycle, as promotion needs to go beyond user acquisition and the launch of the app; listening to your users, building a community, tracking post-install events and optimizing acquisition budgets to maximize the users’ lifetime value (LTV) are now standard requirements for app publishers and marketers.

Getting into a bit more of detail, the event was structured in four parts:

  • App Stores - maximizing visibility (App Store Optimization)

  • User Acquisition- being specific, paid user acquisition

  • Lessons learned by successful app publishers

  • The next wave: what lies ahead in the field of mobile marketing

aps

Here’s a non-comprehensive selection of the topics covered (highlights):

Games are still king

Games are still extremely well represented in overall app store downloads and revenues: on iPhone, between August 2012 and 2013, 33% of all downloads came from games. On iPad, this figures amounts to 50%. On Google Play, games make up 37% of downloads and on Amazon, 67%!

In terms of revenue, games represent 84% of all apps on iPhone, 73% on iPad on 84% on Google Play. In South Korea’ Play Store (the dominant platform), games generated as high as 94% of all store revenues.

App distribution: look to alternative solutions

In terms of app store marketing, a lesser known topic was covered: alternative Android app stores, beyond Google Play.

In this regard, Apple App Store and the Google Play Store are very similar to the Panama Canal; they are bottlenecks: competitive, difficult and expensive to get through.

In this context, app marketers need alternative routes and thereby alternative app stores have some nice pros:

  • Extra distribution outlets, additional reach and much less competition. In China for instance, Tencent App Gem has as many downloads per app and per month as Google Play overall ($3,000). On a side note, in China 72.6% of Android apps are distributed through alternative app stores.

  • Paid promotion services (such as on Amazon Apps and AndroidPIT), which are so far non existent on the Apple AppStore and Google Play

  • Access to new markets; Google Play is only available in 134 countries (vs. 196 countries worldwide according to the UN) and not in China

  • Additional branding presence

  • TinyCo revealed that their ARPU is higher on the Amazon Store than on the Apple App Store or the Play Store.

On the other hand, the cons are:

  • The app store marketing assets (meta data such as file formats, number of characters in the title etc.) are different on each store.

  • You need to carefully plan the time to market, as you cannot realistically launch in more than 3 app stores simultaneously.

  • You need to handle reporting for each of them (luckily there are aggregator tools out there to help you out)

Optimization is no option

On the topic of advertised promotions, the audience was reminded that the creative is often the very first contact of the users with the app. In this sense, creatives are part of the product, and they systematically need to be optimized. It has been proven that A/B testing more than 10 variations of the same creative increased back to back conversions by 25%...

We ourselves at AppLift presented the three waves of paid user acquisition:

The industry is currently in the last stage, where the focus is primarily put on tracking post-install events in regards to engagement, virality and monetization metrics. In turn, this enables advertisers to allocate their UA budgets to the best-performing traffic sources and thereby optimize the lifetime value of the users acquired. A complete wrap up of the presentation is available on pocketgamer.biz.

The Social Network

Facebook as a tool for app promotion (newsfeed ads) was also big on the agenda. An interesting psychological study states that checking your newsfeed apps to see how many people liked that holiday sunset picture triggers an addictive dopamine rush, which in turn produces a feeling of excitement and gets you hooked to the app!

A few other interesting Facebook figures:

  • Facebook produces 180 billion daily newsfeed impressions

  • In 2013, Facebook was the second mobile advertising company in the word after Google with 15% market share, up from 5% in 2012. In 2011, Facebook was not yet making any revenue on mobile.

  • 7 out of 10 people check Facebook before going to sleep.

  • In Germany, 76% of Facebook’s Monthly Active Users come back to the app daily.

Finally, some interesting data points were shown on the best days of the week to promote your app on Facebook, optimizing two variables: average conversion rate (CVR) and CPI. It turns out the best 2 days to advertise are Thursday (average CVR but low CPI) and Sunday (average CPI and high CVR).

Rekindling the spark

Retargeting and remarketing is also due to become a more important topic for app marketers, as studies show that 25% of users open an app only once, while 69% of users open an app less than 10 times. Publishers thereby need to think about the whole lifecycle of the app and their users, not just the launch period. In 2014, we should hear a lot more about retargeting.

“Users age like fine wine”

The audience was also advised that, when setting up in-app analytics tracking, app publishers should be careful not to compare apples to oranges: use cohort analytics to erase all interference and track KPIs which are comparable as well as mirror what you actually want your users to do.

iOS publishers, brace yourselves: video is coming.

Last week, the unexpected presence of a video on the Apple feature page for NaturalMotion’s game Clumsy Ninja is likely to forebode the more general introduction of videos on the iOS AppStore, which will create a great opportunity for publishers. Get ready! Regarding Google Play, where video has already been part of the app store assets for some time, developers should integrate the Google Analytics SDK in order to track the Google Play funnel and conduct A/B testing on the app store creatives.

apssmall

That's it!What’s your take on the latest developments in app promotion and marketing? We’re keen on hearing your thoughts! If you need additional insights, or would like to contribute your own to the blog with a guest post, don’t hesitate to drop us a line at blog@www.applift.com.

[yks-mailchimp-list id="b97ff5c6cc"]

Wrapping up a day of individual speeches and panel discussions, the main takeaway from the event is probably the fact that the mobile market is no longer a landgrab. Away from the early days of intransparency and lack of education, the industry is getting more educated and structured as most of the players have now positioned themselves along the mobile value chain.

The second element to take out is the growing focus on the user lifecycle, as promotion needs to go beyond user acquisition and the launch of the app; listening to your users, building a community, tracking post-install events and optimizing acquisition budgets to maximize the users’ lifetime value (LTV) are now standard requirements for app publishers and marketers.

Getting into a bit more of detail, the event was structured in four parts:

  • App Stores - maximizing visibility (App Store Optimization)

  • User Acquisition- being specific, paid user acquisition

  • Lessons learned by successful app publishers

  • The next wave: what lies ahead in the field of mobile marketing

aps

Here’s a non-comprehensive selection of the topics covered (highlights):

Games are still king

Games are still extremely well represented in overall app store downloads and revenues: on iPhone, between August 2012 and 2013, 33% of all downloads came from games. On iPad, this figures amounts to 50%. On Google Play, games make up 37% of downloads and on Amazon, 67%!

In terms of revenue, games represent 84% of all apps on iPhone, 73% on iPad on 84% on Google Play. In South Korea’ Play Store (the dominant platform), games generated as high as 94% of all store revenues.

App distribution: look to alternative solutions

In terms of app store marketing, a lesser known topic was covered: alternative Android app stores, beyond Google Play.

In this regard, Apple App Store and the Google Play Store are very similar to the Panama Canal; they are bottlenecks: competitive, difficult and expensive to get through.

In this context, app marketers need alternative routes and thereby alternative app stores have some nice pros:

  • Extra distribution outlets, additional reach and much less competition. In China for instance, Tencent App Gem has as many downloads per app and per month as Google Play overall ($3,000). On a side note, in China 72.6% of Android apps are distributed through alternative app stores.

  • Paid promotion services (such as on Amazon Apps and AndroidPIT), which are so far non existent on the Apple AppStore and Google Play

  • Access to new markets; Google Play is only available in 134 countries (vs. 196 countries worldwide according to the UN) and not in China

  • Additional branding presence

  • TinyCo revealed that their ARPU is higher on the Amazon Store than on the Apple App Store or the Play Store.

On the other hand, the cons are:

  • The app store marketing assets (meta data such as file formats, number of characters in the title etc.) are different on each store.

  • You need to carefully plan the time to market, as you cannot realistically launch in more than 3 app stores simultaneously.

  • You need to handle reporting for each of them (luckily there are aggregator tools out there to help you out)

Optimization is no option

On the topic of advertised promotions, the audience was reminded that the creative is often the very first contact of the users with the app. In this sense, creatives are part of the product, and they systematically need to be optimized. It has been proven that A/B testing more than 10 variations of the same creative increased back to back conversions by 25%...

We ourselves at AppLift presented the three waves of paid user acquisition:

The industry is currently in the last stage, where the focus is primarily put on tracking post-install events in regards to engagement, virality and monetization metrics. In turn, this enables advertisers to allocate their UA budgets to the best-performing traffic sources and thereby optimize the lifetime value of the users acquired. A complete wrap up of the presentation is available on pocketgamer.biz.

The Social Network

Facebook as a tool for app promotion (newsfeed ads) was also big on the agenda. An interesting psychological study states that checking your newsfeed apps to see how many people liked that holiday sunset picture triggers an addictive dopamine rush, which in turn produces a feeling of excitement and gets you hooked to the app!

A few other interesting Facebook figures:

  • Facebook produces 180 billion daily newsfeed impressions

  • In 2013, Facebook was the second mobile advertising company in the word after Google with 15% market share, up from 5% in 2012. In 2011, Facebook was not yet making any revenue on mobile.

  • 7 out of 10 people check Facebook before going to sleep.

  • In Germany, 76% of Facebook’s Monthly Active Users come back to the app daily.

Finally, some interesting data points were shown on the best days of the week to promote your app on Facebook, optimizing two variables: average conversion rate (CVR) and CPI. It turns out the best 2 days to advertise are Thursday (average CVR but low CPI) and Sunday (average CPI and high CVR).

Rekindling the spark

Retargeting and remarketing is also due to become a more important topic for app marketers, as studies show that 25% of users open an app only once, while 69% of users open an app less than 10 times. Publishers thereby need to think about the whole lifecycle of the app and their users, not just the launch period. In 2014, we should hear a lot more about retargeting.

“Users age like fine wine”

The audience was also advised that, when setting up in-app analytics tracking, app publishers should be careful not to compare apples to oranges: use cohort analytics to erase all interference and track KPIs which are comparable as well as mirror what you actually want your users to do.

iOS publishers, brace yourselves: video is coming.

Last week, the unexpected presence of a video on the Apple feature page for NaturalMotion’s game Clumsy Ninja is likely to forebode the more general introduction of videos on the iOS AppStore, which will create a great opportunity for publishers. Get ready! Regarding Google Play, where video has already been part of the app store assets for some time, developers should integrate the Google Analytics SDK in order to track the Google Play funnel and conduct A/B testing on the app store creatives.

apssmall

That's it!What’s your take on the latest developments in app promotion and marketing? We’re keen on hearing your thoughts! If you need additional insights, or would like to contribute your own to the blog with a guest post, don’t hesitate to drop us a line at blog@www.applift.com.

[yks-mailchimp-list id="b97ff5c6cc"]

Thomas Sommer
Thomas heads up content marketing at AppLift. As such he’s in charge of sourcing, curating, creating and distributing insightful content to increase visibility and thought leadership for the company. Thomas loves to scrutinize the relentless and trilling developments of the mobile industry. You can follow him on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Thomas